answers: 40

  1. Vsevolod
    06.11.2020

    IMHO it is practically pointless at today's stage of development of editors, they today allow you to do the same by simply pulling the sliders - the same DxO has a tutorial on this https://www.dxo.com/project/creating-an-hdr-effect-from-a-single-raw-image/ ... Plus, Sony has an in-chamber D-Range Optimizer, which works exactly the same as I understand it. But if you have the opportunity to compare two approaches (from the same file or creating "bracketing") - it would be interesting to take a look.

    Reply

  2. Paul
    06.11.2020

    Theoretically, by correcting the ranges in Raw, you can, of course, achieve an even better effect, especially if you also correct the ranges themselves for the task or do it in the curves. But the method described above is remarkable first of all because it can be automated by a script and give on average the same good results like painstaking work with sliders and ranges.

    Reply

  3. Alex
    06.11.2020

    probably it was worth putting out at least one raw file so that you could play with it and compare it with your results

    Reply

    • Arkady Shapoval
      06.11.2020

      No problem, here

      Reply

      • Alex
        06.11.2020

        aha, thanks a lot!

        there is one more nuance that confuses.
        sensors with a large DD, usually do not like overexposure and have a large margin of shadow pull. so a scene with really big DD on them is usually shot with a large exposure compensation in minus to preserve the light.
        accordingly, generating a symmetrically corrected jpeg from such a file does not seem to be practical advice.

        Reply

      • Arkady Shapoval
        06.11.2020

        These are the nuances that I mentioned. For example, the S5 pro's lights stretch perfectly. The method can be customized for a specific camera.

        Reply

      • twm
        06.11.2020

        > usually do not like overexposure and have a large margin of shadow pull
        Depends on the camera, apparently: for example, the ETTR (expose to the right) rule helps me quite well on (relatively old) Fuji and Pentax carcasses: the sky is in place, and the shadows without noise in the case of landscapes.
        Sony also works well at 20-24 MP. And vice versa - on ancient Olympus, if you have to choose, I'd rather underexpose.

        I think it is quite realistic to find out the limit for your camera, when information in the shadows / lights is irretrievably knocked out.

        PS although - in the case of some lenses - under- or overexposure = frame in the trash. True, then bracketing saves :-)

        Reply

      • Alex
        06.11.2020

        twisted the example - it is completely incomprehensible why to take so much.
        you just bring up the shadows in the raw and you get exactly the same “HDR”.
        and there are a lot of lights in the frame, which does not fit with the idea of ​​getting HDR)

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      • Arkady Shapoval
        06.11.2020

        Look, it's not just that I indicated “Pseudo-HDR” in the title of the note.

        Reply

      • Neo
        06.11.2020

        It's written
        But with modern cameras, and the usual correction of shadows, midtones and highlights results in decent pseudo-HDR without the need to do exposure bracketing.

        Reply

  4. Statkevich Andrey
    06.11.2020

    hdr with variable aperture - you can see that the shadows outside the depth of field are in the “haze”, although the ripples on the water and the reflection are clear. HDR + 0- 1 stop in constant exposure and ISO mode, variable aperture. Thanks to the variable depth of field (0 on hyperfocal), it was possible to achieve natural image reproduction (just glued in HDR).

    Reply

    • Michael
      06.11.2020

      Interesting application

      Reply

    • twm
      06.11.2020

      And a really interesting trick. Thanks for sharing

      Reply

    • Novel
      09.11.2020

      Why is this necessary? hdr variable aperture?
      What mode do you shoot hdr in?
      Here is my example hdr without changing the aperture.

      Reply

      • Novel
        09.11.2020

        Well, the exposure is determined by two parameters - aperture and shutter speed. ISO, formally, does not affect exposure, the amount of light remains the same, the gain changes. So, for exposure, it is usually customary to play with shutter speed, providing under-light and overexposure for it. But nothing prevents you from doing aperture bracketing for exactly the same purposes. An interesting idea, you will have to try and see what happens. As a result, an underexposed picture will be sharper due to a greater depth of field, an overexposed picture, on the contrary.

        Reply

  5. after all
    06.11.2020

    Why is this necessary if there is HDR on the camera?

    Reply

    • Arkady Shapoval
      06.11.2020

      Which one?

      Reply

      • after all
        06.11.2020

        Well, I have an asus 3 years ago. he has )

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      • Victor
        06.11.2020

        Since when did Asus release cameras? o_O

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      • after all
        07.11.2020

        ever since cameras got into smartphones

        Reply

      • Michael
        07.11.2020

        I also have it on Olympus e-m10, but I don't use it. The pentaxes also seemed to have K-5 and younger

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      • Vitaly
        08.11.2020

        Canon Rp has HDR for example, but it is only for architecture, tk. takes three frames.
        During this time, the model has time to move.

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      • Volodymyr
        16.11.2020

        Canon D700 ma HDR mode (3 frames).

        Reply

      • Arkady Shapoval
        16.11.2020

        700d

        Reply

    • Tserg
      07.11.2020

      Asus does not produce cameras. Laptops, smartphones, PCs and monitors, watches and various stuffing for them. The commentator means, as I understand it, the ZenFone 6 smartphone. It has a 48mm retractable camera and the ability to shoot HDR. It is sad when people do not distinguish the camera from the camera in the smartphone ((q

      Reply

  6. Anderss beverens
    06.11.2020

    Dear experts, do I understand correctly that this method does not work with just the native Nikon Capture NX-D converter?

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    • Michael
      07.11.2020

      Works. Also, you make an exposure from raves with export to jpeg. Then sew with something

      Reply

      • Anderss beverens
        08.11.2020

        This is the main point of the question - it is impossible to stitch with Nikon Capture NX-D, as far as I understand. Can you tell me the available version of the "stapler" to test the method?

        Reply

      • Michael
        09.11.2020

        To be honest, I have not seen a normal HDR stapler)) I am usually not satisfied with the result, maybe my hands are not from there. There is Photomatix Pro - it works pretty well, both as a plugin for Photoshop, and separately.

        Reply

      • Novel
        09.11.2020

        HDR as a rip-eyed "processing" went out of fashion already when I first became interested in it. The familiar effect of instantaneous tonal range compression is very difficult to achieve. And it is not necessary, in principle.

        In general, processing really comes down to adequate manipulation of only three sliders during development - exposure, blacks, whites. If necessary, contrast in minus on images with hard light or plus on low-contrast ones, followed by fine-tuning of blacks, whites, exposure. If still not enough, you can try shadows / highlights, but this time as a tool of last resort - it gives you that disgusting pseudo-HDR effect. The problem is that blacks / whites manipulate the headroom for shadows and highlights that is present on a 12-14-bit equal when trying to display them on an 8-bit monitor, while shadows / highlights work with an 8-bit remainder, with masks. leaving this nasty border at the borders of the passages. Here are these typical landscapes, when they are trying to draw out a distant very dark forest with the "shadow" tool, and above the edge of the trees there is a strip that limits the area of ​​the mask created by the blurred image.

        Well, if you want to draw out individual bright areas - lights, the sun - you can make a stack of several images - with real bracketing or like this, artificial, and separately, using handles, to show the necessary elements using a mask. Apologists for erotic forms of inaccessible ideals will begin to wrinkle their noses, but competent photo processing is sometimes a more significant tool than the most coveted camera with the most legendary lens on it.

        Reply

      • Michael
        09.11.2020

        These sliders work with the same image, so the palette will be the same. The algorithms used are different, from this and the border. HDR is a cool thing, but programs usually do not correctly glue the exposure, so I forgot about this thing - it's better to apply a mask

        Reply

      • Novel
        09.11.2020

        The original image is 12 or 14 bit, stretched to 16 bit. Target - 8-bit. Usually “tails” in highlights and shadows are cut off, there are few significant pixels. But if the picture is very contrasting, such as hard daylight in the open sun, a dark key or a light key, or a banal wedding with a groom in a dark suit and a bride in a snow-white dress (there are still options with skin colors), then the image can be compressed by pulling up the tails with one side or the other. Real HDR would give the opportunity to depict the entire tonal range, but in the absence of such an opportunity, a kind of "tone mapping" is used. At the same time, the image quality does not suffer, on the contrary, we add those details that could be lost.

        Reply

      • Novel
        09.11.2020

        But these “pseudo-HDRs” are shadows / highlights on steroids, when dark and light pixels are pulled from the tails to the center, because they are not visible at the edges, and the eye's sensitivity is lower, and the gamma curve gives maximum contrast in the center ... In this case, the pixels do not stretch all, but along the mask, which is a blurred image. Something must remain white, and something black, otherwise the image will be tonally incomplete. But it looks pretty jagged and dumb. I saw a dozen images - I saw everything.

        Reply

      • Michael
        09.11.2020

        Yes, it's all clear, okay, let's go)

        Reply

  7. alexey_laa
    06.11.2020

    I have sometimes had to use a combination of differently processed files from the same RAW. But I did not use an application for HDR photos, but manually in the GIMP editor loaded files with different processing into layers, then wiped areas in different layers and got a combined image. Here is an example of a photo (Panasonic Lumix DMC-G3 camera, 2017, now I probably would do better) :(https://ibb.co/NC8JqDp) From additional layers I added faces and also background - sky and buildings. Original JPG from camera: (https://ibb.co/7K1kM2w)

    I also tried to master traditional HDR before, I used a plugin for GIMP. The results weren't great, but the original photos themselves weren't great either. Now I found another plugin for GIMP, similar to those that I used earlier. But with this, the results are much better, and my original photos are now better too. This autumn I just took pictures of buildings in Kiev with evening illumination for the competition "Vіki to love pam'yatki". It turns out, for example, like this: (https://ibb.co/LhQMXRV), original JPG from camera: (https://ibb.co/Bnj1jfQ)

    Reply

    • Ivan
      07.11.2020

      EXIF shows that this is not a G3, but a G80. And it appeared in 2011, not 2017.

      Reply

      • alexey_laa
        07.11.2020

        I have a new Panasonic Lumix DMC-G80 camera, HDR photos were taken on it. And the first photos on the G3, then I had one.

        I downloaded the file from the first example again - JPG from camera (https://ibb.co/L5ttCcL), I downloaded the wrong file first.

        Reply

  8. Charles
    07.11.2020

    In portraits, pseudo HDR is often redundant, but yes, it's an excellent technique, I use it all the time.

    Reply

  9. Sergei
    07.11.2020

    I use Lightroom. I downloaded plugins and among them there is HDR processing. The RAW file produces sharper, more vibrant photos. Is this also a pseudo-HDR? Or is it something else?

    Reply

    • Arkady Shapoval
      07.11.2020

      Yes, + - the same - dd extension from one RAW file

      Reply

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