Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer Review

According provided by lens Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer (OS, AF) for Nikon many thanks to Alexander Fetisov.

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer Review

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer Review

Among the fast zoom 70-200 / 2.8 class in the Sigma lens line, there are several models:

  1. Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO EX HSM Is the oldest version.
  2. Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG EX HSM is an updated model, with the same optical design as the first version, but the lens is already optimized for working on digital SLR cameras. The main difference from the previous model is improved enlightenment.
  3. Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 Macro APO DG EX HSM - a version with a different optical design, produced since 2008. The main difference is a different MDF and more weight.
  4. Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 II Macro APO DG EX HSM - Model II, updated previous version.
  5. Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG EX HSM Optical Stabilizer, released in 2010, has a built-in image stabilizer. This lens is presented in this review.

The Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer is a classic, professional, fast telephoto lens with image stabilization. This lens will be a good helper for a huge number of photographers in a huge number of photographic tasks. Personally, don't feed me with bread, but let me shoot on a 'light' TV set. Sigma 70-200 / 2.8 OS is available for various brands of SLR cameras, this review presents a version for Nikon cameras with Nikon F mount.

In addition, there is another interesting lens of this kind - Sigma AF Zoom APO 70-210mm 1: 2.8 (two versions).

View from the Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer mount

View from the Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer mount

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer is externally identical to the 'cropped' version of the lens - Sigma 50-150mm 1: 2.8 APO DC HSM EX Optical Stabilizer (for Nikon)... The body, hood, caps and markings are identical for both lenses. The only differences are the different inscriptions: '50 -150 'and '70 -200', 'DC' and 'DG', and the full-length has a depth of field scale, which is not available for a cropped lens. Therefore, this review will partially resemble the review Sigma 50-150mm 1: 2.8 APO DC HSM EX Optical Stabilizer :).

Sigma Covers 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer

Sigma Covers 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer

Everything is top notch in the Sigma 70-200 / 2.8 OS lens, which should correspond to the 'EX' designation ('Excellent' - top quality lenses). First of all, I would like to note a very good build. The lens itself is very huge and heavy - it weighs as much as 1430 grams and uses large 77mm 'professional' light filters (a kind of standard for professional photographic equipment).

Sigma 21-70mm 200: 1 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer Tripod Foot

Sigma 21-70mm 200: 1 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer Tripod Foot

The focus ring and zoom are rubberized, rotate smoothly and nicely. The focus ring is a little narrow, its stroke is 120 degrees. During auto focus, the ring remains stationary. In manual focus mode, when the ring reaches its extreme positions, it does not rest, but continues to rotate, slipping, like on many native Nikon lenses. When focusing and changing the focal length, the lens does not change its size, because it has internal systems of focusing and zooming. At the same time, the rear lens also remains stationary (no 'vacuum cleaner' effect).

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer

The lens focuses using the HSM motor (HyperSonic Motor, an analog of Nikon SWM) quite quickly and almost silently. It is a pity, but still I did not observe an instantaneous reaction in the focusing system. Sigma 70-200 / 2.8 OS will fit all Nikon cameras, even those that don’t inboard motor focusing. The closest focusing distance is 140 cm and the maximum macro zoom ratio is 1: 8.

If compare focusing time from infinity to MDF and back with the native Nikon 70-200 / 2.8 VRII, then the latter focuses about 2 times faster :(. Yes, and the Sigma 70-200 / 2.8 OS does not change the speed of automatic focusing depending on the focal length or on the orientation of the lens.

There is a focus switch 'AF / M' ('Auto / Manual') on the case, as well as a three-position switch for stabilizer operation mode 'OFF-1-2'. In '1' mode, the lens stabilizes along 2 axes (analogous to Nikon Active VR). In '2' mode, stabilization is performed in only one direction (mode for shooting panoramas, analogous to Nikon Normal VR). In the 'OFF' position, the stabilizer is turned off. The stabilizer turns on when you press the focus button (usually a half-press on the shutter button). As soon as you press the shutter button, for an instant the picture in the viewfinder trembles significantly and the sound is heard from turning on the stabilizer. The same thing happens when the stabilizer stops working. This is normal and should not be scared.

On the case there is a focus distance scale in meters and feet, as well as depth of field scales for the wide-angle range (indicated by the letter 'w' - 'wide' - 'wide' for F / 5.6, 11, 16, 22) and for the television range (indicated by the letter 't' - 'tele' - 'tele-band' for F / 22 only).

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer

The lens comes with a wonderful case, lens hood, lens hood extension for cropped cameras and a tripod foot. The tripod foot can be easily removed, and there are 3 marks on the lens body to quickly rotate the camera mounted on a tripod to portrait or landscape position (vertically or horizontally). The tripod foot can rotate freely 360 degrees around its axis. To remove the foot, pull on its clamp.

The lens hood can be installed in the reverse position (transport mode), only when the hood is worn back and forth, access to the focus ring and the zoom ring are completely lost. With a lens hood, the lens looks very, very solid :)

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer

Sigma 70-200 / 2.8 OS can use a special Sigma APS-C Hood HA 850-01, which serves as an extension of the main hood LH850-02 to work on cameras with an APS-C sensor. As you know, the field of view on cropped cameras with Sigma 70-200 / 2.8 OS will be narrower, and therefore the hood can be made longer and at the same time blocked more parasitic flares. A very interesting and simple solution to improve image quality when using a lens on cropped cameras. The Sigma APS-C Hood HA 850-01 fits into the slots on the lens, and the main hood is installed into the slots of the nozzle. In some cases, the nozzle itself can serve as a small hood.

Enlightenment of the front lens Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer

Enlightenment of the front lens Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer

The TS-21 tripod foot and LH850-02 lens hood are also used by the lens. Sigma 50-150mm 1: 2.8 APO DC HSM EX Optical Stabilizer, which is analogous to Sigma 70-200 / 2.8 OS for cropped cameras. In addition, the TS-70 tripod foot can be attached to the Sigma 200-2.8 / 41 OS lens.

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer with a hood

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer with a hood

The optical design of 22 elements in 17 groups has 3 SLD elements and 2 FLD elements. 'SLD' - 'Special Low Dispersion' - 'low dispersion elements' and FLD 'F Low Dispersion' analog Nikon Extra-low Dispersion... Thanks to this optical design, the lens is close to apochromats, as evidenced by the APO ('Apochromatic') inscription in the lens name.

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer with hood in transport mode

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer with hood in transport mode

It is stated that the lens supports constant manual focus control. This is true, only such control works exclusively in AF-S and AF-A and only after the camera successfully focuses. The lens does not have a full-fledged mode of constant manual focus control Nikon M / A, and, in fact, performing manual focus override with the Sigma 70-200 / 2.8 OS starts to compete with camera and lens automatics. We can say that Sigma 70-200 / 2.8 OS has only focus mode Nikon A / M. Personally, this annoys me a lot. Native Nikon optics with this mode immediately turns off auto focus as soon as you touch the focus ring and it does not depend on the focus mode set in the camera. Most third-party manufacturers have not learned how to copy this wonderful feature. Of course, you should not worry about this, I think few users of this lens will notice the difference at all.

Extension cord for hood Sigma APS-C Hood HA 850-01

Extension cord for hood Sigma APS-C Hood HA 850-01

Diaphragm consists of 9 petals, closes over the entire range of focal lengths to F / 22. The circles in the blur zone almost always remain smooth :).

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer with Extension

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer with Extension

Personally, I liked the Sigma 70-200 / 2.8 OS, though it's hard for me to recommend it instead of my family Nikon ED AF Nikkor 80-200mm 1: 2.8D (MKII) и Nikon ED AF-S Nikkor 80-200mm 1: 2.8D MKIV... I think that a stabilizer in this focal length range is a very profitable solution, but the native lenses that I reviewed were much better at F / 2.8. Of course, if there are funds, then personally I would prefer Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm 1: 2.8G ED VR (even a second-hand version) or Nikon N AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm 1: 2.8GII ED VR: ).

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer with extension and hood

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer with extension and hood

It is stated that the stabilizer can compensate for 4 stops excerpts, for example, the native Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm 1: 2.8G ED VR (first version) had a stabilizer, which was announced about 3 stops of compensation excerpts... Of course, 4 stops is the maximum, in real conditions the lens stretches 4 stops weakly. For me personally, when shooting handheld, the image stabilizer allowed me to shoot at 1 / 60s and 200mm focal length without any problems.

On Nikon DX cameras, the EGF of the lens will be 105-300 mm. When I use this lens on cameras Nikon D700 и D80 There were no problems with focus accuracy.

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer with extension and hood in transport mode

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer with extension and hood in transport mode

Optically, the Sigma 70-200 / 2.8 OS turned out to be a good lens, however, I would find fault with not the best sharpness at F / 2.8 (it does not reach the native 80-200 / 2.8 MKIII, MKIV), as well as a small distortion almost everywhere range of focal lengths (if you don't look very closely at the pictures, you will never find it), vignetting at open apertures (in more than half of the scenes, you will not notice vignette either), weak chromatic aberrations. They say that the Sigma 70-200 / 2.8 OS seriously loses to the native nanocrystalline monster Nikon N AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm 1: 2.8GII ED VR in sharpness, especially in the corners, but the price tag of the native lens is completely different :). I think the Sigma 70-200 / 2.8 OS is a pretty good lens in terms of price / quality ratio. I want to note that the sample from this review turned out to be optically weaker Sigma 50-150mm 1: 2.8  (when used on the same Nikon D80).

Here link to the archive with the originals - 716 MB, 70 photos in .NEF format (RAW) from cameras Nikon D700 (FX) and  Nikon D80 (DX). When shooting was used protective filter Hoya HMC UV (c) 77mm, for examples of the operation of the lens with highlights and highlights I protective filter filmed to see the 'naked' result. Many thanks to Vika aka DoveHunter for her good mood.

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX OS on the ZK

Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX OS on the ZK

Catalog of modern Sigma lenses can look at this link.

Below is a list of all fast class 70-200 / 2.8 lenses with built-in image stabilizer:

Canon (Canon EF / EF-S / RF)

  1. Canon Zoom Lens EF 70-200mm 1: 2.8 L IS USM
  2. Canon Zoom Lens EF 70-200mm 1: 2.8 L IS II USM
  3. Canon Zoom Lens EF 70-200mm 1: 2.8 L IS III USM
  4. Canon Lens RF 70-200mm F2.8 L IS USM

Nikon (Nikon F, Z)

  1. Nikon ED AF-S VR-Nikkor 70-200mm 1: 2.8G Vibration Reduction SWM IF (black or silver version)
  2. Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm 1: 2.8GII ED N VR Nano Crystal Coat SWM IF
  3. Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm 1: 2.8E FL ED N VR Nano Crystal Coat SWM IF + its modification 'Nikon 100th Anniversary Edition'
  4. Nikon Nikkor Z 70-200mm 1: 2.8 VR S

Sony (Sony E)

  1. Sony FE 2.8 / 70-200 GM OSS (SEL-70200G)

Sigma (for different mounts)

  1. Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX OS (Optical Stabilizer) (for Canon EF / EF-S, Nikon F, Sony / Minolta A, Sigma SA, Pentax K, no longer available for Pentax)
  2. Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 DG OS HSM S | Sport (for Canon EF / EF-S, Nikon F, Sigma SA)

Tamron (for different mounts)

  1. Tamron USD DI SP 70-200mm F / 2.8 VC Ultrasonic Silent Drive A009 (for Canon EF / EF-S, Nikon F and Sony / Minolta A)
  2. Tamron SP 70-200mm f / 2.8 Di VC USD G2 A025 (for Canon EF / EF-S, Nikon F)
  3. Tamron 70-180mm F / 2.8 Di III VXD Model A056 (Sony FE only)

Panasonic

  1. Panasonic LUMIX S PRO 1: 2.8 /70-200 mm Ois

Nikon ED AF Nikkor 80-200mm 1: 2.8D (MKII) and Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer

Nikon ED AF Nikkor 80-200mm 1: 2.8D (MKII) and Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer


In the comments, you can ask a question on the topic and they will answer you, as well as you can express your opinion or describe your experience. For the selection of photographic equipment, I recommend large catalogs, for example E-Catalog. Many little things for the photo can be found on AliExpress.


Results

The Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer is a very pleasant lens, made to the highest standard with internal focusing and zoom, as well as image stabilization and a comfortable focal length range. True, optically, I would like a slightly better performance at F / 2.8, perhaps there is a difference in quality between Sigma lenses.

The material was prepared by Arkady Shapoval. My Youtube channeland Radozhiva's group on Facebook и VK.

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Comments: 74, on the topic: Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 APO DG HSM EX Optical Stabilizer review

  • Alexander

    Hello everyone. There is such a canon. When the stub is turned on, multiple buzzing is heard. This is normal?

    • notapic

      Alexander, this is a stabilizer. This sound is also on other Sigma glasses with a stub, everything is ok.

  • Jury

    Thanks for the detailed description of the object. I use it in conjunction with Nikon D7100. Works flawlessly in various modes. Recently I switched to the D750 and noticed that the Sigma stabilizer does not work stably - one after another. Perhaps the Sigma 70-200 does not fit the Nikon D750? Do you, Arkady or the readers have any experience with this lens and this camera?

  • Alexander

    Hello! Please tell me, according to your feelings, which version is more successful, this lens, or 2.8 APO EX HSM (which is the oldest)? It is possible to take one of these. Most of all, is there a difference in sharpness on open at all focal

  • to_c

    Hello!
    There is a question about the coverage of the 4th version - Sigma 70-200mm 1: 2.8 II Macro.
    Was it produced without velvet?

  • Oleg

    The lens is cool, but it does not pull modern cropped multi-pixel matrices, it is more soapy at the edges.
    Compared Canon EOS 20D at f2.8 (shooting in the city from 100m, sharp throughout the frame) and Canon EOS 90D at f4.0 (shooting at home from 600m, sharp only in the center, decently lathers around the edges)

    • Victor

      The stupidity with 32MP on the crop has been created so far only by the canon, and even then in a couple of models)) This matrix does not solve much at all, even native fresh zooms, like the same 18-135 usm, are not even close.

      • Oleg

        Here are the folks testing what the 90D reveals:
        http://www.michaelthemaven.com/?postID=5117&canon-90d-m6ii-lenses-which-have-enough-resolving-power-which-do-not

        And according to DxoMark tests, 18-135 itself is not so hot, but you can live, and in terms of sharpness it loses 18-55 older versions.

        • Seladir

          But I'm thinking of changing the Sigma 17-70 2.8-4 Contemp to Canon 18-135 USM. The aperture is not as important to me as the focal range, but the decision seems motivated only if 18-135 is also sharper, including on 24MP, or even 32MP matrices.

        • Victor

          18-135 usm for 90d

          https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/50241167266_83bc6339fe_o.jpg

          In my opinion, everything is very bad.

          • Oleg

            Overpaying for this is not a hunt.
            There was a thought once, but dark, and for the “tele” range I already have a high-aperture sigma, so, just in case, I took a new kit 18-55 / 4-5.6. It's enough for garbage. And I am a reporter, a naturalist, I need a body and a macro, and the quality is better.
            I will continue to shoot at this sigma on a new carcass, since it is not on the body, it is more adequate.

          • Seladir

            Xs, snapshot as snapshot. All this kind of stuff somehow shoots, and on full-frame cameras the pictures often look like this when there is a lot of foliage and grass, if it's just a random person uploaded a random frame. Perhaps the edges would be nicer if the diaphragm was not open to its maximum. And in terms of overall detail, I resized to 18MP, since I have had an eye for these Canon matrices for years, in general, we can say that it looks better than footage from 18MP cameras.

            • Victor

              Well, if the detail is acceptable for you, then you can safely take it)))

              To me, it looks terrible for glass for 40k rubles.

            • Victor

              And the matrix itself at 90d is very so-so (of course, I am writing now without taking into account resizes, and if resize to 18 ... 12MP, then why do you need 90d at all?) - even at minimal iso there is noise in the sky and porridge in the shadows. And users also complain about noticeable micro-lubricants.

              • Oleg

                I shot at 12800, I liked it, the main thing here is that the exposure was normal and there was no need to pull out the shadows.
                32MP on crop sensitive to all kinds of jitter, there is such

              • Victor

                For me, it's better to have a clean picture on the minimum, but here everyone has his own)))

              • Oleg

                Even at 51200, you can shoot, the noise is not fully pressed, for the "effect".
                But that won't work for everything.
                I filmed sports on 20D on iso 400 ... Fortunately, it was 50 / 1.4 (amen to him, sorry).
                You just need to use it correctly.
                I spent a week in LightRoom to adequately process pictures from the 90D.
                Noise and little harshness are noticeable with defloration settings.
                Or try it in Capture One, there it is better with the default settings.

              • Oleg

                Yes, I'm not a fan of bullying iso either, but circumstances ... sports, birds, etc. require short exposures.
                Therefore, you need to be able to use the device (know its capabilities), use the correct glasses (but this may be a budget larger than the camera) and be able to process photographs.

    • Seladir

      What do you get if you resize an image from 90D to 20D and then view it at 100%? Is there a win / loss in the center / at the edges?
      And then the theme “the lens does not resolve the matrix” sometimes sounds as if there is a complete and sharp degradation in multi-pixel matrices. As if the lens is designed to send a fixed number of beams approximately the size of pixels, and those unfortunate ones run and blur somewhere in the middle between small pixels, leading to a disgusting soapy spot. Well, this is somehow fantasy.

      • Oleg

        This Sigma has a very great center everywhere.
        My monitor is 32 ″ 1440p :)
        f4.0 200mm, brick house 450m
        I cut it to 20D, the differences are barely noticeable at the edges.
        In the original version, the center is super, and then, somewhere around 20-25% of the edges, you can already see the soap well.

        It's not about the rays, but about the optical scheme and the quality of the glass. And the rays are all in place, just to the periphery you need to focus the rays, and the farther from the center, the more problematic it is.
        Play around here https://www.dxomark.com/Lenses/
        For this sigma (2010), you can choose 550D (it was not tested on newer crops) and full-frame 5s are all.
        Many zooms have a problem at the edges, but it is not everywhere, but in some focal ranges, and for everyone it is different.
        On the same site you can compare the old kenon 70-200 / 2.8 is usm and the newer (2nd version), the quality is also very different.

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