Shutter noise

Usually, the simple phrase “shutter release” in modern digital SLR cameras is understood as a whole complex of complex mechanical interactions of camera assemblies.

Shutter noise

Shutter noise

Here's what happens when you press the shutter button most of the DSLR cameras:

  1. The main mirror rises. The mirror lifting speed is very high, while the mirror slightly hits its edge against special “pads” located near the matte focusing screen.
  2. When lifting the main mirror, extra small mirror slams, thus blocking the flow of excess light from the optical viewfinder.
  3. A special shutter closes the slit of the focus sensors. The curtain is under the mirror.
  4. The aperture control mechanism is activated. For example, Nikon and Pentax cameras have a special device that covers the diaphragm - the diaphragm pusher. This is a special protrusion near the camera mount that hits the metal receiver on the lens or releases the receiver - thus closing and opening the diaphragm. The sound from the drummer is very loud, and the drummer itself requires a lot of energy. Canon cameras lack a hammer, as the aperture is controlled directly by the electronics and mechanics of the lens itself.
  5. The aperture blades close, while the aperture blades rub against each other slightly, creating additional noise. In the lens Nikon 50mm1: 1.8D AF Nikkor you can clearly hear the metallic ringing when closing the aperture blades.
  6. The first shutter curtain is lowered.
  7. With a certain delay, the second shutter curtain is lowered. The shutter lamellas move very quickly and when they reach the extreme positions they produce a characteristic sound. Some shutters, for example in cameras Sony Alpha NEX-5 create most of the noise.
  8. After the second curtain completely descended, the camera returns both shutter curtains to their original position
  9. The diaphragm drummer usually performs a full cycle. After the shutter was released, the drummer completely closes the diaphragm, and then automatically opens it. It may seem strange, but that is how all Nikon lenses work.
  10. The mirror drops back.
  11. An additional mirror leans back. In this case, the platoon of the striker mechanism and the mirror lifter can be simultaneously executed.
  12. The focus shutter returns to its main position.

This is a huge process that happens with the usual “release” of the shutter in modern DSLR cameras. The cycle itself happens very quickly, and as a result, we we can hear only one click, but if you listen to the camera, you will clearly hear a set of individual sounds.

Certain disadvantage of DSLR cameras is exactly the excess noise during shutter release so my camera Nikon D700 has a very hard and noisy "shutter" and this very often gets in the way with certain types of shooting. In order for the camera to operate more quietly, it is often equipped with a special 'quiet' shooting mode. In practice, such a “quiet” shooting mode simply divides the “shutter release” cycle into stages, for example, it raises the mirror in advance and lowers it only after releasing the shutter button, but due to the fact that the camera mechanisms cannot operate slower than their set of speeds noise reduction it turns out insignificant.

Thank you for attention. Arkady Shapoval.

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Comments: 85, on the subject: Shutter noise

  • Alexey

    Let me quote a joke from a magazine about stereo. There are so many settings in modern expensive equipment that it seems that you can even adjust your own income level :))

  • Nika

    What happens when you press the shutter button completely ???

  • Nika

    What happens when you press the shutter button completely in Sony a 58 ????

  • Nika

    in Sony a 58 ????

  • Sergei

    Nikon. Need help! When you press the depth-of-field control button with the aperture closed, the blades close the aperture to the set value, but then do not open back. Sometimes this happens when shooting. The display shows Err. if you remove the lens, you can see that the pusher is not returned to its original position, but is stuck. When you press the depth-of-field control button again, the pusher moves back. Works flawlessly without a lens. With a lens, this happens at aperture

    • Arkady Shapoval

      Contact the service.

      • Sergei

        The fact is that the camera is ancient. Repair will cost more than the camera itself. She probably worked her own, but throwing away is a pity

        • yarkiy

          So unscrew the bayonet mount, maybe there’s business, some kind of dust.

  • Frolo

    And I have Sony R1, there is no noise, the shutter is central.

  • Vlad

    And on the official photography of presidents and other persons, it is necessary to introduce a ban on "DSLRs" and bring advanced digital cameras. The noise from the "DSLRs" is unbearable, what people say is sometimes completely inaudible.

    • uhuru

      They are not smart at the photo shoot. However, they do not say anything clever at all. And at least they understand that they are being photographed.

    • Oleg

      I agree! Forbid DSLRs, allow sniper rifles.

  • anonym

    After shooting with Camera Conrol Pro, the shutter sound changed to a more “clattering” sound, and before that there was a “rustling” camera on the D300s. Or it seemed to me? Has anyone encountered such a problem?

    • Novel

      Did you accidentally turn on the “quiet” shutter mode there? Quiet mode.

      • anonym

        I do not see such a setting at all in CCP.

        • Novel

          In the camera. It is possible that CCP includes it on its own. Silent mode still look in the settings.

          • anonym

            everything was decided by resetting the settings, now again the rustle is pleasant to the ear.

    • anonym

      The shutter noise is different at 12bit color and at 14bit, try it, just at 12bit it is more “rustling”.

      • B. R. P.

        And where does the color ?!

      • anonym

        Wow, that is, is everything so serious?

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