Nikon Lens and Camera Information

This article describes the main features of Nikon lenses and cameras, especially their compatibility with each other.

Nikon Lenses & Cameras

Nikon Lenses & Cameras

Navigation:

  1. Miscellaneous Mounts for Nikon Digital Cameras
  2. Nikon DX, Nikon FX, Nikon CX, IX-Nikkor

  3. Auto focus
  4. Iris control
  5. Focus distance transmission, D-type lenses
  6. Old Nikon autofocus lenses
  7. Example of 'reading' the lens name
  8. Comments
Basic separation of Nikon interchangeable lens cameras

Basic separation of Nikon interchangeable lens cameras

Miscellaneous Mounts for Nikon Digital Cameras

A bayonet is a method of attaching a lens to a camera.

Nikon digital cameras with interchangeable lenses are divided into three types, depending on the type of mount.

  • digital Mirror Cameras (CZK) with a bayonet mount Nikon F
  • digital Mirrorless Cameras (BZK) with a bayonet mount Nikon Z
  • digital Mirrorless Cameras (BZK) with a bayonet mount Nikon 1

All lenses with Nikon F mount can be used on cameras with Nikon Z mount using a special adapter Nikon FTZ. With this adapter, only Nikon lenses that have a built-in focus motor (marked with a lens name) are fully compatible. AF-I, AF-S, AF-P).

Nikon F mount 'AF' lenses (with autofocus support but no built-in focus motor) will not auto focus on cameras Nikon Z using adapter Nikon FTZ.

List of all Nikon DSLR cameras with Nikon F mount

D1, D1h, D1x, D2x, D2h, D2xs, D2hs, D100, D200, D300, D300s, D500, D50, D70, D70s, D80, D90, D7000, D7100, D7200, D7500, D40, D40x, D60, D3000, D3100, D3200, D3300, D3400, D3500, D5000, D5100, D5200, D5300, D5500, D5600, D600, D610, D700, D750, D780, D800, D800E, D810, D810a, D850, D3, D3s, D3x, D4, D4s, D5, D6, Df + Kodak DCS PRO 14n (and its modifications) and Kodak DCS Pro SLR / n (and its modifications) + Fujifilm FinePix S1 Pro, S2 Pro, S3 Pro, S3 Pro UVIRS5 Pro, IS Pro.

List of all Nikon digital mirrorless cameras with Nikon Z mount

  1. Nikon Z5
  2. Nikon Z6
  3. Nikon z6 ii
  4. Nikon Z7
  5. Nikon z7 ii
  6. Nikon Z9
  7. Nikon Z50

List of all 'Nikon Nikkor Z' full-frame lenses for mirrorless cameras with Nikon Z mount

Fixes:

  1. Nikon Nikkor Z 20mm 1: 1.8 S
  2. Nikon Nikkor Z 24mm 1: 1.8 S
  3. Nikon Nikkor Z 35mm 1: 1.8 S
  4. Nikon Nikkor Z 50 mm 1:1.2 S
  5. Nikon Nikkor Z 50mm 1: 1.8 S
  6. Nikon Nikkor Z 58 mm 1:0.95 S Nod
  7. Nikon Nikkor Z 85mm 1: 1.8 S

Zuma:

  1. Nikon Nikkor Z 14-24 mm 1:2.8 S
  2. Nikon Nikkor Z 14-30mm 1: 4 S
  3. Nikon Nikkor Z 24-50mm 1: 4-6.3
  4. Nikon Nikkor Z 24-70mm 1: 4 S
  5. Nikon Nikkor Z 24-70mm 1: 2.8 S
  6. Nikon Nikkor Z 24-200mm 1: 4-6.3 VR
  7. Nikon Nikkor Z 70-200mm 1: 2.8 VR S

Lenses are designed to work with Nikon Z series cameras: Z5, Z6, Z6 II, Z7, Z7 II , Z9 + Z50.

All of these lenses have a Nikon STM (Stepping Motor) built-in focusing motor, similar to lenses. Nikon AF-P. As well as an electromagnetic diaphragm similar to lenses Nikon E.

The letter 'S' in the name of these lenses only denotes their belonging to the line of professional mirrorless solutions.

The exact list of system mirrorless cameras with interchangeable lenses Nikon 1:

Nikon has released a series of mirrorless cameras with interchangeable lenses and Nikon 1 mount and 1 Nikkor lenses (they are also called Nikon CX).

On these cameras, it is best to use specially designed Nikon CX lenses (the same as 1 Nikkor).

An exact list of all Nikkor 1 lenses:

Fix Lenses:

  1. Nikon 1 NIKKOR 10mm f / 2.8 (black and silver)
  2. Nikon 1 NIKKOR AW 10mm f / 2.8 (only black)
  3. Nikon 1 NIKKOR 18.5mm f / 1.8 (black, silver, white)
  4. Nikon 1 NIKKOR 32mm f / 1.2 (black, silver)

Zoom lenses

  1. Nikon 1 NIKKOR VR 6.7-13mm f / 3.5-5.6 (black and silver)
  2. Nikon 1 NIKKOR VR 10-30mm f / 3.5-5.6 (8 color options)
  3. Nikon 1 NIKKOR VR 10-30mm f / 3.5-5.6 PD-ZOOM (6 color options)
  4. Nikon 1 NIKKOR VR 10-100mm f / 4-5.6 (5 color options)
  5. Nikon 1 NIKKOR VR 10-100mm f / 4.5-5.6 PD-ZOOM (only black)
  6. Nikon 1 NIKKOR 11-27.5mm f / 3.5-5.6 (6 color options)
  7. Nikon 1 NIKKOR AW 11-27.5mm f / 3.5-5.6 (black, silver, white)
  8. Nikon 1 NIKKOR VR 30-110mm f / 3.8-5.6 (8 color options)
  9. Nikon 1 NIKKOR VR 70-300mm f / 4.5-5.6 N (only black)
  • AW (All Weather) are weatherproof lenses. These lenses are best suited for a rugged camera Nikon 1 AW1.
  • PD-Zoom (Power Drive Zoom) - auto zoom lenses. With these lenses, the focal length can be changed automatically instead of manually rotating the zoom ring. To do this, these lenses have a slider TW (Tele - Wide, for zooming in tele [Tele] range or wide-angle [Wide] range).

To install FX or DX lenses on Nikon 1 series cameras you need to use FT1 adapter at the same time, automatic focusing is retained only with AF-S lenses (possibly AF-P) and only with certain lenses specified in this the table.

UPD: In the summer of 2018, the Nikon 1 system stopped its development.

Nikon FX and Nikon DX digital cameras and lenses, their difference

Nikon digital and mirrorless cameras are divided into two types, depending on the size of the sensor: FX and DX. Lenses for these cameras are also marked in the same way.

FX lenses are designed for full-format FX cameras (also called full-frame, or full-size, or full-frame).

DX lenses are designed for cropped DX cameras (they are also called crop, or cameras with APS-C sensor size).

Nikon FX cameras have a matrix the size of a classic 35 mm film, DX cameras have a smaller matrix, the so-called 'cropped', with a frame diagonal 1.5 times smaller than in FX.

The full-size Nikon D750 camera is labeled 'FX' on its chassis. Here it is shown along with the Nikon N AF-S Nikkor 24-120mm 1: 4G ED VR SWM IF Aspherical Nano Crystal Coat full-lens

Full-format camera Nikon D750 has the 'FX' mark on its body. He is shown here with a full-frame lens. Nikon N AF-S Nikkor 24-120mm 1: 4G ED VR SWM IF Aspherical Nano Crystal Coat

Before the Nikon DX cameras, there were only full-frame Nikon FX cameras and lenses that don't really have the FX designation, since at that time it was not necessary to separate the full frame and the cropped one. Examples of lenses from full-frame cameras:

As you can see, the prefix 'FX' is not indicated in the lens name. If the lens is not labeled DX or CX, then it is a full frame lens for an FX camera.

After the advent of digital SLR cameras, Nikon DX, the manufacturer, to save on glass, metal and plastic, began the production of DX lenses. And all lenses for cropped cameras already had the DX designation. Examples of DX lenses:

As you can see, all lenses have the letters DX in the name.


Important about DX and FX


Exact list of all Nikon DX cameras:

D1, D1h, D1x, D2x, D2h, D2xs, D2hs, D100, D200, D300, D300s, D500, D70, D70s, D80, D90, D7000, D7100, D7200, D7500, D40, D40x, D60, D3000, D3100, D3200, D3300, D3400, D3500, D5000, D5100, D5200, D5300, D5500, D5600

Nikon Z: Z50

+ Fujifilm FinePix S1 Pro, S2 Pro, S3 Pro, S3 Pro UVIRS5 Pro, IS Pro.

It is very important, so important that everyone should know this: All Nikon DX series cameras have the same real physical size of their sensor (matrix). The size is approximately 23.6 mm X 15.8 mm. Physical size is not directly related to the number of MegaPixels.


Exact listing of all Nikon FX cameras

Nikon F: D600, D610, D700, D750, D780, D800, D800E, D810, D810a, D850, D3, D3s, D3x, D4, D4s, D5, D6, Df

+ Kodak DCS PRO 14n (and its modifications) and Kodak DCS Pro SLR / n (and its modifications)

Nikon Z: Nikon Z5, Nikon Z6, Nikon z6 ii, Nikon Z7, Nikon z7 ii, Nikon Z9

It is very important, so important that everyone should know this: all cameras of the Nikon FX series have the same real physical size of their sensor (matrix). The size is approximately 36 mm X 24 mm. Physical size is not directly related to the number of MegaPixels.

Recommended use:

  • All Nikon DX lenses can and should preferably be used on Nikon DX series sprinkler cameras (the exact list is listed above).
  • All Nikon DX lenses can be used on full-frame cameras such as Nikon D3, D3s, D3x, D4, D4s, D5, D6, Df, D600, D610, D700, D750, D780, D800, D800E, D810, D810a, D850 but the camera will either use only part of its sensor to take the photo, or the resulting image will have unrecoverable vignetting and other distortions at the edges and corners of the frame. This is due to the fact that DX lenses cannot project an image onto a large matrix of FX cameras. Using DX lenses on FX cameras is not recommended.... Full-frame cameras can automatically recognize and adjust the DX lens to work with it. Personally, I see no reason to buy an expensive full frame DSLR camera and use more 'simple' DX lenses on it.
  • For all Nikon FX cameras, it is recommended that you use only Nikon FX lenses.
  • All full-frame lenses (lenses from FX cameras) can be used on DX cameras without any problems, and you only need to consider the visual effect of crop factor.

As an example, a full-frame shot Nikon D700 FX (Full frame) and cropped lens Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 35mm 1: 1.8G SWM Aspherical. The camera is set to full-frame mode 'image area FX'. It can be seen that the cropped lens gives black corners (vignette) and the picture is not usable.

Black angled shot

Black angled shot

If you take the same photo, but in the camera mode '' image area DX', then the camera will automatically use only the central area of ​​its sensor and as a result the image will be like any other Nikon DX camera. Below is the same shot on Nikon D700 FX (Full Frame) in 'modeDX image area'.

Indeed, Nikon FX full-frame cameras can use cropped lenses in 'DX' crop mode. In this mode, only the central part of the camera sensor will be used, equal in size to the sensor used in Nikon DX cameras, which will avoid vignetting using a cropped lens on full-frame cameras. To do this, in the camera menu, just turn on the 'Image area' -> 'Select. image area 'and select the' DX format 24x16 'value there.

Full frame in DX mode

Full frame in DX mode

If you summarize the above points, then it begs small conclusion - Conventional FX lenses can be used on all types of cameras: FX and DX. And lenses from cropped DX cameras are not recommended for use on full-frame FX cameras.

An accurate list of all Nikon DX Nikkor lenses

Fixes

  1. Nikon DX AF Fisheye Nikkor 10.5 mm 1: 2.8G ED with a golden ring (review here)
  2. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 35 mm 1: 1.8G SWM Aspherical (review here)
  3. Nikon DX AF-S Microphone Nikkor 40 mm 1: 2.8G SWM (review here)
  4. Nikon DX AF-S Microphone Nikkor 85 mm 1: 3.5G ED VR SWM IF Micro 1: 1 (review here)

Wide angle

  1. Nikon DX AF-P Nikkor 10-20 mm 1: 4.5-5.6G VR (price is here)
  2. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 10-24 mm 1: 3.5-4.5G ED SWM IF Aspherical (review here)
  3. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 12-24 mm 1:4G ED SWM IF Aspherical with a golden ring (review here)

Universal

  1. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 16-80 mm 1: 2.8-4E N ED VR Nano crystal coat SWM IF Aspherical with a golden ring (price is here)
  2. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 16-85 mm 1: 3.5-5.6G ED SWM VR IF Aspherical (review here)
  3. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 17-55 mm 1:2.8G ED SWM IF Aspherical with a golden ring (review here)
  4. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 18-55 mm 1: 3.5-5.6G ED SWM Aspherical [Black / Silver] (review here)
  5. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 18-55 mm 1: 3.5-5.6GII ED SWM Aspherical [black / silver] (review here)
  6. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 18-55 mm 1: 3.5-5.6G SWM VR Aspherical (review here)
  7. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 18-55 mm 1: 3.5-5.6GII VR II (review here)
  8. Nikon DX AF-P Nikkor 18-55 mm 1: 3.5-5.6G (price is here)
  9. Nikon DX AF-P Nikkor 18-55 mm 1: 3.5-5.6G VR (review here)
  10. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 18-70 mm 1: 3.5-4.5G ED SWM IF Aspherical (review here)
  11. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 18-105 mm 1: 3.5-5.6G ED SWM VR IF Aspherical [Thailand / China] (review here)
  12. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 18-135 mm 1: 3.5-5.6G ED SWM IF Aspherical (review here)
  13. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 18-140 mm 1: 3.5-5.6G ED SWM VR IF Aspherical [Thailand / China] (review here)
  14. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 18-200 mm 1: 3.5-5.6G ED SWM VR IF Aspherical [Japan / China] (review here)
  15. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 18-200 mm 1: 3.5-5.6GII ED SWM VR IF Aspherical (review here)
  16. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 18-300 mm 1: 3.5-5.6G ED SWM VR IF Aspherical (price is here)
  17. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 18-300 mm 1: 3.5-6.3G ED SWM VR IF Aspherical (review here)

Televisions

  1. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 55-200 mm 1: 4-5.6G ED SWM [Black / Silver, Japan / China] (review here)
  2. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 55-200 mm 1: 4-5.6G ED VR IF SWM (review here)
  3. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 55-200 mm 1: 4-5.6GII ED VR II (review here)
  4. Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 55-300 mm 1: 4.5-5.6G ED VR SWM HRI (review here)
  5. Nikon DX AF-P Nikkor 70-300 mm 1: 4.5-6.3G ED (price is here)
  6. Nikon DX AF-P Nikkor 70-300 mm 1: 4.5-6.3G ed VR (price is here)


All Nikon DX lenses for mirrorless cameras with Nikon Z mount

  1. Nikon Nikkor Z DX 50-250 1: 4.5-6.3 VR
  2. Nikon Nikkor Z DX 16-50 1: 3.5-6.3 VR

Nikon DX Professional SLR Lenses

I didn't call Nikon DX lenses more 'simple' for a reason. It just so happened that all Nikon professional optics are lenses for the full frame. The only professional lenses for Nikon DX cameras are:

These lenses have gold ring near the front lens - a sign of top class lenses. These lenses are listed on Nikon NPS (Nikon Professional Services).

Attention: Nikon Nikkor DX lenses indicate not the equivalent focal length (EFR), but the physical real focal length of the lens. Focal length is a physical parameter of the lens itself, which does not change when mounted on different cameras. And for FX and DX lenses, to find the EGF when used on cropped DX cameras, you need to multiply the focal length by crop factor Kf = 1.5X. For example, EGF lens Nikon 18-55mm 1: 3.5-5.6GII VR II AF-S DX Nikkor on the cropped camera Nikon D7100 will be 27-82,5mm (18 * 1.5 and 55 * 1.5). The relationship of focal length and viewing angle can be viewed here.

Useful: if you select “Off” in the menu of full-size cameras in the “AF point illumination” setting, then after turning on one of the cropping modes (in fact - cropping), an unused area of ​​the image visible in JVI, will be darkened, which greatly facilitates sighting using crop mode. The following shows how unused areas are obscured. JVI when you turn on certain crop modes.

Dimming the unnecessary area of ​​the viewfinder while shooting in one of the crop modes

Dimming the unnecessary area of ​​the viewfinder while shooting in one of the crop modes


About Auto Focus

For the ability to automatically focus the lens on the Nikon Nikkor lens designations AF, AF-I, AF-S and AF-P.

What is the difference between AF-S / AF-P / AF-I and AF lenses? In the AF lens, focusing is due to the motor of the camera, in such cases it is said that the camera has a 'screwdriver' or focusing motor. In contrast, in AF-S / AF-I / AF-P lenses, focusing is due to a motor directly integrated into the lens itself.

Lenses designated 'AF'

Such lenses do not have a built-in autofocus motor and will automatically focus only on cameras in which there is a focusing motor ('screwdriver').

Defining such a lens is very simple - it only has the 'AF' prefix in its name. Also, these lenses have a special groove on the bayonet side, through which the torque of the 'screwdriver' is transmitted. What is at stake can be seen in the photos below:

AF Lens - Highlights

AF Lens - Highlights

An exact list of Nikon DSLR cameras with a built-in focus motor:

D50, D70, D70s, D80, D90, D100, D200, D300, D300s, D500, D7000, D7100, D7200, D7500, D600, D610, D700, D750, D780, D800, D800E, D810D810a, D850, D1, D1h, D1x, D2x, D2xs, D2h, D2hs, D3, D3x, D3s, D4, D4s, D5, D6, Df

+ Fujifilm FinePix S1 Pro, S2 Pro, S3 Pro, S3 Pro UVIRS5 Pro, IS Pro, Kodak DCS PRO 14n (and its modifications) and Kodak DCS Pro SLR / n (and its modifications)

An example of an 'AF' type lens - Nikon AF Nikkor 70-300mm 1: 4-5.6G. In turn, this lens will not be able to automatically focus on cameras that do not have a focus motor.

Cameras that do not have a built-in focus motor require the use of AF-S / AF-I / AF-P lenses.

Exact list of Nikon digital cameras without built-in focus motor:

D40, D40x, D60, D3000, D3100, D3200, D3300, D3400, D3500, D5000, D5100, D5200, D5300, D5500, D5600

+ Nikon Z5, Nikon Z6, Nikon z6 ii, Nikon Z7, Nikon z7 ii, Nikon Z9, Nikon Z50 using adapter Nikon FTZ

With these cameras, only auto focus and sound confirmation of focus will not work, all other important functions, such as auto metering exposure and auto iris control will work well.

Lenses designated 'AF-S'

For such lenses, the focus motor is already integrated directly into the lens barrel. These lenses will automatically focus on all Nikon cameras. These lenses include Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm 1: 1.8G SWM Aspherical.

The designation 'AF-S' is on the main lens name, which is usually written in golden letters. The photo shows the Nikon N AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm 1: 4G ED SWM VR IF Nano Crystal Coat

'AF-S' on the main lens name, which is usually written in gold letters. The photo shows Nikon N AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm 1: 4G ED SWM VR IF Nano Crystal Coat

Almost always on AF-S lenses, you can also find the prefix 'SWM', which stands for Silent Wave Motor (silent wave / ultrasonic motor).

Important: SWM motors come in two main types, details here.

If you use optics from other manufacturers, you need to know for sure whether the lens has a built-in motor or not, the designations of each manufacturer have their own and do not intersect with the designations of Nikon Nikkor lenses.

It is often said that on junior cameras from the Nikon line (their list is just above) you cannot use 'serious optics', but in fact this is a delusion. The point is only that autofocusing with certain lenses (and all functions associated with focusing) will not work with these cameras. When focusing manually, confirmation of successful focusing will be green circle in the viewfinder, and Live View and electronic range finder nobody canceled.

Attention: Nikon’s new non-motorized cameras still lose the ability to automatically control distortion (distortion, vignetting) when working with non-motorized lenses. All other functions will work just as well as with optics that have a focus motor.

If you install an AF-S, AF-P or AF-I lens on a camera with a built-in focus motor, which also has a built-in focus motor, then this is not a big deal. In this case, the built-in motor of the camera simply turns off automatically, and focusing is always performed only with the lens motor. There will never be any conflicts in the work between the camera and the lens.

Interesting: when using AF lenses, different cameras may have different focusing speeds. This issue has been considered in detail. here.

Important: due to certain features related with no EE lever for reading the extreme position of the diaphragm ringon cameras Nikon D3400, D3500 The following 'AF-S D' type lenses will not work properly (this only applies to these cameras):

  1. Nikon ED AF-S Nikkor 17-35mm 1: 2.8D SWM IF Aspherical
  2. Nikon ED AF-S Nikkor 28-70mm 1: 2.8D SWM
  3. Nikon ED AF-S Nikkor 80-200mm 1: 2.8D Silent wave motor
  4. Nikon ED AF-S Nikkor 300mm 1: 4D
  5. Nikon ED AF-S Nikkor 300mm 1: 2.8D
  6. Nikon ED AF-S Nikkor 300mm 1: 2.8D II
  7. Nikon ED AF-S Nikkor 400mm 1: 2.8D [black / silver]
  8. Nikon ED AF-S Nikkor 400mm 1: 2.8D II
  9. Nikon ED AF-S Nikkor 500mm 1: 4D
  10. Nikon ED AF-S Nikkor 500mm 1: 4D II
  11. Nikon ED AF-S Nikkor 600mm 1: 4D
  12. Nikon ED AF-S Nikkor 600mm 1: 4D II
  13. as well as all lenses AF-I

Lenses designated 'AF-P'

Nikon introduced Nikon Nikkor 'AF-P' lenses in January 2016. Designation 'AF-P' (Auto Focus Pulse motor) indicates the presence of a fast and Nikon STM (Stepping Motor) focusing motor. 'AF-P' lenses work similarly to 'AF-S', only quieter, faster and more accurate. The same type of motor is used for lenses for mirrorless cameras Nikon Z.

Designation 'AF-P' on the Nikon DX AF-P Nikkor 18-55mm 1: 3.5-5.6G

Nikon DX AF-P Nikkor 18-55mm 1: 3.5-5.6G designated 'AF-P'

Please note that not all Nikon cameras will be able to work correctly with 'AF-P' lenses, some cameras will need to be updated to be fully 'AF-P' compatible.

Full list of Nikon 'AF-P' lenses:

  1. Nikon DX AF-P Nikkor 10-20 mm 1: 4.5-5.6G VR
  2. Nikon DX AF-P Nikkor 18-55 mm 1: 3.5-5.6G
  3. Nikon DX AF-P Nikkor 18-55 mm 1: 3.5-5.6G VR
  4. Nikon DX AF-P Nikkor 70-300 mm 1: 4.5-6.3G ED
  5. Nikon DX AF-P Nikkor 70-300 mm 1: 4.5-6.3G ED VR
  6. Nikon AF-P Nikkor 70-300 mm 1: 4.5-5.6E VR ED

Auto focus with AF-P lenses will only work with cameras (exact list):

D5200, D5300, D5500, D5600, D3300, D3400, D3500, D7100, D7200, D7500, D500 + D4, D4s, D5D6, Df, D800, D800E, D810, D810a, D850, D750, D780, D600, D610 + Nikon Z6, Nikon z6 ii, Nikon Z7, Nikon z7 ii, Nikon Z5, Nikon Z50 with adapter FTZ

Important: some of these cameras will need to use the latest firmware.

Auto and manual focus will not work with cameras (exact list):

D700, D3, D3s, D3x, D1, D1h, D1x, D2x, D2h, D2xs, D2hs, D100, D200, D300, D300s, D50, D70, D70s, D80, D90, D7000, D40, D40x, D60, D3000, D3100, D3200, D5000, D5100 + Fujifilm FinePix S1 Pro, S2 Pro, S3 Pro, S3 Pro UVIR, S5 Pro, IS Pro + Kodak DCS PRO 14n и Kodak DCS Pro SLR / n.

Lenses designated 'AF-I'

Side are the Nikon AF-I lenses. Motor lenses per se 'AF-I' (Auto Focus Internal Motor) - very rare lenses, and also very expensive. Some users mistakenly refer to them as 'AF-1' ('AF-one').

Some of these lenses use a built-in focusing motor for focusing, built on the basis of conventional electric micro-motors, which are pretty noisy during focusing. There is no exact data on what type of motor is used in Nikon AF-I lenses.

Attention: there is no exact information whether amateur-level cameras will work with such lenses. But, most likely, no mortal will ever mount such a lens on a simple amateur camera.

AF-I designation on the Nikon ED AF-I Nikkor 300mm 1: 2.8D lens

AF-I designation on the Nikon ED AF-I Nikkor 300mm 1: 2.8D lens

Full list of Nikon AF-I lenses:

  1. Nikon ED AF-I Nikkor 300mm 1: 2.8D, 1992-1996
  2. Nikon ED AF-I Nikkor 400mm 1: 2.8D, 1994-1998
  3. Nikon ED AF-I Nikkor 500mm 1: 4D, 1994-1997
  4. Nikon ED AF-I Nikkor 600mm 1: 4D, 1992-1996

When choosing a lens, the most important parameters are its type (FX, DX) and the focusing method. If you now know which FX or DX camera you have, with or without a built-in focus motor, then selecting the lens with just these two parameters will give you all the necessary functions for shooting.

Typically, lenses without a built-in focusing motor are cheaper than their motorized counterparts. If you have a camera with a motor, then in a sense you can save on lenses. As an example, you can look at Nikon 50mm 1: 1.8D AF Nikkor (MKIII)which is very cheap:


All Nikon 50mm F / 1.8 Prices

A version with a focus motor Nikon AF-S 50mm F / 1.8G costs a lot more.


Focus mode switch 'M / A-M' and 'A-M' or lack thereof

Nikon lenses usually have a focus mode switch. The 'A-M' (or 'M-A') switch means the lens can be set to either auto focus mode 'A' (Auto) or only manual focus mode 'M' (Manual). Switch 'M / A-M' indicates that the lens can work in the mode 'M / A' - automatic mode with manual focus correction at any time... 'M' mode allows manual focus control only.

Two types of lens focus mode switch

Two types of lens focus mode switch. Photos from the instructions for the camera Nikon D3200

'M / A' This mode is useful in that you do not need to move the lens to the 'M' position for manual focusing. When you start focusing manually in 'M / A' mode, auto focus switches off instantly, and the lens 'obeys' only the photographer. 'M / A' works with any available focusing method on the camera itself. If you release the focusing ring, the lens will immediately switch to automatic focusing mode. Also, with its help, you can easily use focus trap effect. If there is no focus mode switch, such as on the lens Nikon 50mm f / 1.8D AF Nikkor, then the focus mode should be selected on the camera itself.

Focus mode switch

Focus mode switch - two views. Also, under the lens mount button, you can see a lever on the camera that performs AF M focus switches for lenses that do not have a switch.

Some Nikon lenses have additional specific modes 'A / m'and'Memory Recall', read about which you can here... And there are also features of the 'A' focus mode for some Nikkor AF-S lenses with an 'A-M' switch, which you can read about here.


About Iris Control Features

On Nikon lenses you can meet another interesting designation - letter 'G' - a lens with such a letter can control the diaphragm only directly from the camera, but the lens does not have an aperture control ring.

G ('Gelded') lenses are virtually impossible to use with some older film cameras as the aperture will be permanently closed there. Also, lenses with an aperture control ring (Non-G) can be used more flexibly for all kinds of photography surveys, such as reverse macro shot.

Mythology: It is often said that there are 'D' and 'G' lenses, D with an aperture control ring and G without an iris control ring. In fact it's a delusion - the letter 'D' (or 'AF-D') indicates the possibility of transferring the focusing distance to the subject to the camera - this makes it easier to calculate the flash power for the correct exposure... The misconception stems from the fact that almost all 'D' lenses have an aperture ring, since they did not previously denote a division into lenses with an aperture ring and without an aperture ring.

The difference between the lens G and without G (for example, Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm 1: 1.4D and Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm 1: 1.4G SWM lenses)

The difference of the lens G and without G (for example, lenses Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm 1: 1.4D и Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm 1: 1.4G SWM)

The protrusion for reading the extreme position of the aperture ring on the Nikon AF Nikkor 85mm 1: 1.8D lens, which is a NON-G type lens, that is, one that has an aperture control ring.

Lug for reading the extreme position of the aperture ring on the lens Nikon AF Nikkor 85mm 1: 1.8Dwhich is a NON-G type lens, that is, one that has an aperture control ring.

Very important: To use a 'NON-G' type lens (with aperture ring) in the same way as a G type lens (control aperture from the camera), you need to set the aperture control ring to the maximum F-number, usually F16, F22, F32 and switch the special lock on the lens, which will fix the iris control ring in a fixed position. Different lenses either lock the ring themselves in the extreme position, or require manual locking using a special switch. If this is not done, some cameras will display an 'fEE' error (aperture ring not set).

Some cameras allow you to control the iris with autofocus NON-G lenses in metering modes exposure A (aperture priority) and M (manual) with the aperture ring. To do this, in the camera menu, find the item 'Configure command dials' -> 'Set aperture' and set the value 'Aperture ring'. In S modes (priority excerpts) and P (program mode), the display will still show an 'fEE' error (no aperture ring set). When using autofocus lenses, I recommend using the 'Set Command Dials' -> 'Set Aperture' -> 'Sub Command Dial' function.

In addition, Nikon has released several lenses'E'-type, which also do not have a diaphragm control ring, and the diaphragm itself is closed by an electromagnetic drive located inside the lens. More details in the section 'Nikon E'.

Important: Nikon D3400, D3500 the only cameras that do not support auto iris control with Non-G lenses (which have an iris control ring). With these lenses Nikon D3400, D3500 cameras only work in 'M' mode (in fact, with all lenses that have an aperture control ring, cameras Nikon D3400, D3500 will not work).


The difference between D lenses and just AF lenses without the letter D (Non-D)

The letter “D” in the lens name indicates that the camera receives information from the lens about the distance at which the lens was focused.

The difference in AF D and just AF lenses

The difference in AF D and just AF lenses

It's important: All 'G' and 'E' type lenses also transmit to the camera a value about the focusing distance to the subject and are simultaneously 'D' lenses.

Remember once and for all: the letter 'D' has nothing to do with the aperture ring. It just so happens that most lenses with an aperture control ring are capable of transmitting focusing distance and are marked with the letter 'D'. Usually lenses are marked at the same time 0 'G' and 'AF-S', or simultaneously 'AF 'and' D 'but there are many exceptions, for example Nikon ED AF Nikkor 28-200mm 1:3.5-5.6G IF Aspherical - an instance that does not have a diaphragm control ring (G), but at the same time has an old AF screwdriver focus. Also, for example, there is Nikon 28-70mm 1: 2.8D ED AF-S Nikkor - which has a built-in focusing motor (AF-S) and aperture control ring (NON-G), while transmitting the focusing distance (D).

Differences when using AF lenses with the letter D and AF without “D” when the flash is off, you will not notice, since it is practically absent. But it’s worth turning the flash into TTL mode, as soon as you feel the difference in metering exposure. Important: AF lenses without the letter “D” (NON-D) in their name, do not convey focusing distance values ​​and are poorly metering exposure with TTL flash units. To make it easier to understand what I'm talking about, I conducted a test. I mounted a camera on a tripod Nikon D200 with Nikon flash S in TTL mode. The first shot I took with a lens Nikon 35-70mm f / 3.3-4.5 AF Nikkor (without the letter D in the name), the second with the lens Nikon 35mm f / 1.8G AF-S DX Nikkor. It immediately became clear that the picture from the first lens was poorly exposed

Difference in flash operation between Non-D, D lenses

Difference in flash operation between Non-D, D lenses

There are a lot of AF lenses without “D” (NON-D), for example Nikon 70-210mm f / 4 AF or Nikon 35-70mm f / 3.3-4.5 AF Nikkor... If you do not plan to use AF lenses without “D” with flash, then you can safely buy them and shoot at your pleasure. And for good automatic flash work, you need to take AF with the letter D or AF-S / AF-P / AF-I lenses.

Attention: Also, transmitting the focusing distance to the camera allows you to use 3D Matrix Metering on some Nikon film cameras, which can significantly improve the quality of the exposure meter.

'E' type lenses

The most recent modern lenses in their name have the letter 'E', which means'Electromagnetic diaphragm '-'Electromagnetic diaphragm'. These lenses control the aperture (open and close the petals) using an electromagnetic mechanism built into the lens. As with 'G' type lenses, 'E' type lenses do not have an aperture ring. 'E' type lenses are also 'G' type lenses.

Don't be confused with the new 'E' marking, which indicates how the aperture works, and the old 'E (LENS SERIES E)' marking, which indicates budget manual lenses such as Nikon Lens Series E 50mm 1: 1.8.

'E' designation for electromagnetic iris lenses

'E' Coding for Electromagnetic Diaphragm Lenses

The exact list of digital cameras that support working with 'E'-type lenses:

Nikon D3, D3s, D3x, D4, D4s, D5, D6, Df, D600, D610, D700, D750, D780, D800, D800E, D810, D810a, D850, D300, D300s, D500, D7000, D7100, D7200, D7500, D5000, D5100, D5200, D5300, D5500, D5600, D3100, D3200, D3300, D3400, D3500

+ Nikon Z5, Nikon Z6, Nikon z6 ii, Nikon Z7, Nikon z7 ii, Nikon Z50 with Nikon FTZ adapter

+ Nikon 1 J1, J2, J3, J4, J5, S1, S2, V1, V2, V3, AW 1 with Nikon FT-1 adapter

The exact list of cameras that do not support working with 'E'-type lenses:

Nikon D1, D1h, D1x, D2x, D2h, D2xs, D2hs, D40, D40x, D50, D60, D70, D70s, D80, D90, D100, D200, D3000

+ Fujifilm FinePix S1 Pro, S2 Pro, S3 Pro, S3 Pro UVIR, S5 Pro, IS Pro

+ Kodak DCS PRO 14n и Kodak DCS Pro SLR / n

'E' type lenses on the cameras in this list will always shoot at full aperture. Other features of the work are possible.

Complete list of all Nikon 'E' lenses:

You will find more useful information in this section. 'Nikon' E Lenses.


Old non-autofocus (manual) Nikon lenses

Nikon has a lot of old lenses that don't have an autofocus system. Such lenses require manual focus, as well as on younger Nikon cameras unavailable metering exposure. Some lenses are still available, for example, Nikon 50mm f / 1.2 AI-S Nikkor MF. Usually, old lenses are indicated by letters MF, AI, AI-S, PRE-AI, NON-AI. All of them say that the lens does not have autofocus and indicate the type of iris control.

You can find more details about working with old lenses in my separate article “Work with old Nikon lenses".


An example of 'reading' lens designations:

The rest of the letters in the names of the lenses simply indicate the presence of some additional features. Consider the long name of the lens Nikon DX AF-S Nikkor 18-200mm 1: 3.5-5.6GII ED SWM VR IF Aspherical

  • Nikon - Nikon lens.
  • DX - The lens is designed for DX cameras, on FX cameras it will give strong vignetting.
  • AF-S - the lens has a built-in focusing motor and it will be possible to focus automatically on any Nikon DSLR camera.
  • Nikkor - almost all lenses from Nikon are called 'Nikkor' (Almost all).
  • 18-200 mm Is a limit indicator focal length lens. 18 mm is the widest angle, 200 mm is the narrowest angle.
  • 1: 3.5-5.6 Is an indicator of the maximum relative aperture of the lens. Maximum aperture of f / 3.5 is available at 18mm focal length, at 200mm only f / 5.6 is available. That is, it indicates that the zoom changes aperture the lens.
  • G - you can control the aperture only from the camera. The diaphragm ring is missing.
  • II - (near the letter G) - designation of the second lens modification.
  • ED - Extra-low Dispersion Glass speaks of what is used in the lens special low dispersion glass, which allows you to get a better picture
  • SWM - Silent Wbird Motor - quiet wave (ultrasonic) focus motor. Indication of the type of focus motor.
  • VR - Vibration Reduction - a stabilizer that allows you to use longer excerpts for shooting without grease.
  • IF - Internal Focusing - lens with internal focusing, when focusing, the front lens does not move. Important when using filters.
  • Aspherical - the lens uses special aspherical ASP, to improve the image.
  • Ø72 - diameter of the front light filter
  • Made in thailand - country of origin, made in Thailand.

Similarly, just by the name of any lens can draw a lot of useful information. You will find recommendations for choosing a camera and lenses here.

Comments here on the site do not require any registration. In the comments, you can ask a question on the topic, or leave your feedback, or describe your experience. For the selection of photographic equipment, I recommend E-Catalog. Many little things for the photo can be found on AliExpress.

Я constantly updating and supplementing this article... Last time the article was edited 28.10.2020/5/XNUMX (added information on ZXNUMX).

The material was prepared by Arkady Shapoval. My Youtube channeland Radozhiva's group on Facebook и VK.

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Comments: 671, on the topic: Information on lenses and cameras Nikon

  • Sergei

    How much will it “darken” the exposure, if it is presented on the Nikon exposure compensation scale.

    • B. R. P.

      With a 1,7 converter, you will have a conditionally 119-510mm F.6,8-9,52.

  • Sergei

    Thank. Got it.

  • Irina

    Good evening, thanks for the article! I shoot with Nikon D600, for myself, mostly nature. I cannot decide on the choice of the “bird” lens. North, there is often little light. Could you have any advice?

    • Arkady Shapoval

      what is your budget?

      • Irina

        Maximum 1500.

        • Arkady Shapoval

          Check out the Tamron SP 150-600mm f / 5-6.3 Di VC USD G2 and the Sigma 150-600mm f / 5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary, the Sigma 100-400mm f / 5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary and the Tamron 100-400mm f /4.5-6.3 Di VC USD and on the native Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 200-500mm f / 5.6E

          • Irina

            Thanks for the quick response!

  • Irina

    I think 1500 is the maximum that you can.

  • Pokemon

    "Nikon may close two lens factories in Japan in the near future."
    https://photar.ru/smi-nikon-zakroyut-zavod-po-proizvodstvu-obektivov-v-yaponii/

  • Marat

    Good afternoon. Help me decide on the choice of a macro lens for the nikon d600. The budget is not the main thing. ...
    Thank you.

    • Arkady Shapoval

      Macro is different. Perhaps this is generally an object. In general, Nikon 105 / 2.8 VR Micro, Sigma 150 / 2.8 OS, Sigma 180 / 2.8 OS, Sigma 70 / 2.8 Art, Tamron 90 / 2.8 VC, Tokina 100 / 2.8 will be just right.

      • Marat

        thank you

      • Marat

        Is the Sigma APO Macro 180mm f / 2.8 fully compatible with the nikon d600?

        • B. R. P.

          Yes.

    • Alexey

      nikkor 105 2.8D micro

      • Marat

        I have a nikkor 105 2.8D micro, but it lost focus (photographed from a tripod). Maybe there is a way to adjust focus?
        I would be very grateful for your help.

        • B. R. P.

          What do you mean outta? How?

        • Alexey

          screwdriver lenses, which also have a CRC system, do not adjust in focus. however, such macrics always work for sure, unless, of course, you drop it on concrete. I think the problem is in the camera or in crooked hands.

    • Marat

      thank you

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